Find more at: www.womentouruganda.com

KIBALE NATIONAL PARK

Kibale National Park contains one of the loveliest and most varied tracts of tropical forest in Uganda. Forest cover, interspersed with patches of grassland and swamp, dominates the northern and central parts of the park on an elevated plateau.

The park is home to a total of 70 mammal species, most famously 13 species of primate including the chimpanzee.

It also contains over 375 species of birds. Kibale adjoins Queen Elizabeth National Park to the south to create a 180km-long corridor for wildlife between Ishasha, the remote southern sector of Queen Elizabeth National Park, and Sebitoli in the north of Kibale National Park.

The Kibale-Fort Portal area is one of Uganda’s most rewarding destinations to explore. The park lies close to the tranquil Ndali-Kasenda crater area and within half a day’s drive of the Queen Elizabeth, Rwenzori Mountains and Semuliki National Parks, as well as the Toro-Semliki Wildlife Reserve.

Tourism

Tourists can visit Kibale any time throughout the year, although conditions in the park are more difficult during the rainy season. Available tourist accommodation includes lodges notably Ndali Lodge, Primates Lodge, Kibale Safari Lodge, Chimps Nest, Kyaninga Lodge, Kibale Guest Cottages, Crater Valley Kibale, chiChimpanzee Guest House, and many other options in and around Fort Portal town. The park can either be accessed following the Kampala-Mbarara-Kasese-Fort Portal road or a direct route from Kampala-Mubende-Fort Portal.

Chimpanzee tracking is the park's main tourist attraction although a number of forest walks can be arranged not forgetting the chimpanzee habituation experience. Tourists wishing to track the chimps must first obtain a permit.  Chimpanzee tracking Safari in Kibale is done in two shifts including the morning and afternoon shift with permits allocated based on that too, and the number of visitors is tightly controlled to prevent degradation of the habitat and risks to the chimpanzee. There are strict rules for tourists to minimize the risk of diseases passing from them to the chimpanzees as well as maintain their habitat.